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GET TO KNOW: BRANDON BROSHER

Predictions, odds, and statistics are thwarted by those who make defying the expectations set for them not a wish or a dream, but a necessity.

The Cyclones catcher Brandon Brosher made such a decision after suffering from a gruesome leg injury last season resulting from a nasty fall in the dugout after a spat of rain. The fluke slip put him out for five months non-weight bearing on top of three months of rehab.

The projected outlook on Brosher’s recovery following the injury was far from positive.

“The doctors said that there’s a good chance I would never play again,” Brosher said. “I didn’t believe it. I told myself that’s just never going to happen and now I’m here.”

Recovery for Brosher was only the first step back to baseball. After completing physical therapy rehabilitation, he returned to the plate but still had to get back into the swing of things—literally.

“Getting my swing back [was the toughest part of the transition]. I really started to figure it out at the end of extended spring training last year but going into the season—earlier I was doing really well and I felt really confident—but then going back to it, spring training the following year was the first time I had seen live pitching in half a year. Getting reacquainted to it and finding the rhythm of my swing and everything, that was the hardest part.”

After overcoming the many obstacles he faced on his journey to Brooklyn, the slugger was quick to make up for lost time. Brosher’s bat made some fireworks of its own on the Fourth of July as he sent a rocket solo home run soaring over the left field wall, notching the second of Brooklyn’s two runs scored that night. And that was only the beginning—the following night was one for the Brooklyn record books. Stepping up to plate with the bases loaded, Brosher connected on a 1-2 offering and sent one flying over the left field scoreboard at MCU Park. Giving the Brooklyn a 4-0 lead, the hit also marked the Cyclones’ first grand slam since 2012. A few innings later, Brosher was at it again. The Spring Hill, Florida native went on to hit a bases-clearing double that put him at 7 RBI, a franchise record for the most hit in a single game.

After just five games as a Cyclone, Brosher is batting .667 with runners in scoring position to complement a .917 slugging percentage. With a hot start to the season, Brosher looks to keep his momentum going throughout the rest of the summer—and Cyclone fans hope for the same.

Amidst both challenges and achievements, a strong mindset lays the foundation for Brosher to further enhance his performance. When it comes to maintaining that mindset when he steps up to plate, the key lies remaining poised and avoiding getting overwhelmed.

“Especially as a hitter, if you don’t have confidence going into your at-bat or at the plate, people are going to walk all over you,” Brosher said. “If you have a bad game here, there’s tomorrow. You know, even though it’s a short season, it’s still a long season. There’s always a chance to come back and do better but just not dwelling on the negative and focusing on the positive, its very big factor.”

As Brooklyn’s Boy of Summer continue their season, Brosher looks forward to continuing the transition back to baseball and learning as much as he can along the way. The key to a successful season for this Cyclone is simple—“Staying healthy, not getting hurt—those would be probably the biggest things.”

--Kaylee Pofahl
for BrooklynCyclones.com

Predictions, odds, and statistics are thwarted by those who make defying the expectations set for them not a wish or a dream, but a necessity.

The Cyclones catcher Brandon Brosher made such a decision after suffering from a gruesome leg injury last season resulting from a nasty fall in the dugout after a spat of rain. The fluke slip put him out for five months non-weight bearing on top of three months of rehab.

The projected outlook on Brosher’s recovery following the injury was far from positive.

“The doctors said that there’s a good chance I would never play again,” Brosher said. “I didn’t believe it. I told myself that’s just never going to happen and now I’m here.”

Recovery for Brosher was only the first step back to baseball. After completing physical therapy rehabilitation, he returned to the plate but still had to get back into the swing of things—literally.

“Getting my swing back [was the toughest part of the transition]. I really started to figure it out at the end of extended spring training last year but going into the season—earlier I was doing really well and I felt really confident—but then going back to it, spring training the following year was the first time I had seen live pitching in half a year. Getting reacquainted to it and finding the rhythm of my swing and everything, that was the hardest part.”

After overcoming the many obstacles he faced on his journey to Brooklyn, the slugger was quick to make up for lost time. Brosher’s bat made some fireworks of its own on the Fourth of July as he sent a rocket solo home run soaring over the left field wall, notching the second of Brooklyn’s two runs scored that night. And that was only the beginning—the following night was one for the Brooklyn record books. Stepping up to plate with the bases loaded, Brosher connected on a 1-2 offering and sent one flying over the left field scoreboard at MCU Park. Giving the Brooklyn a 4-0 lead, the hit also marked the Cyclones’ first grand slam since 2012. A few innings later, Brosher was at it again. The Spring Hill, Florida native went on to hit a bases-clearing double that put him at 7 RBI, a franchise record for the most hit in a single game.

After just five games as a Cyclone, Brosher is batting .667 with runners in scoring position to complement a .917 slugging percentage. With a hot start to the season, Brosher looks to keep his momentum going throughout the rest of the summer—and Cyclone fans hope for the same.

Amidst both challenges and achievements, a strong mindset lays the foundation for Brosher to further enhance his performance. When it comes to maintaining that mindset when he steps up to plate, the key lies remaining poised and avoiding getting overwhelmed.

“Especially as a hitter, if you don’t have confidence going into your at-bat or at the plate, people are going to walk all over you,” Brosher said. “If you have a bad game here, there’s tomorrow. You know, even though it’s a short season, it’s still a long season. There’s always a chance to come back and do better but just not dwelling on the negative and focusing on the positive, its very big factor.”

As Brooklyn’s Boy of Summer continue their season, Brosher looks forward to continuing the transition back to baseball and learning as much as he can along the way. The key to a successful season for this Cyclone is simple—“Staying healthy, not getting hurt—those would be probably the biggest things.”

--Kaylee Pofahl
for BrooklynCyclones.com

 



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